Why the Coronavirus Won't Transform International Affairs Like 9/11

Source: National Interest - View Original Article
Published: May 05, 2020
Category:
Bias Rating:

53% Liberal


Bias Score Calculation:


Policies:

Iran

Sentiments

95% "If we are in a new period of global affairs, and if we are no longer in a post-9/11 world, then that shift has ..."
93% "What we have seen instead is a mix of cooperation and confrontation, based on how each power assesses its interests.""
91% "It is challenging the wisdom of over-relying on a single great global-market continuum to provide goods and services necessary both for prosperity and security.""
87% "Nor is it automatic that the damage caused by the pandemic is viewed equally by all states.""
81% "If, over the last several years, the fight against terrorism was losing its luster and the post-9/11 proviso that the United States was threatened ..."
80% "It is testing existing alliance relationships and causing fractures in the current setup of globalization.""
79% "Coronavirus is not becoming the central organizing principle but rather one more factor that countries must deal with in charting their foreign policies.""
77% "Just as Derek Chollett and James Goldgeier coined the 11/9 to 9/11 tag to describe the period between the Fall of the Berlin Wall ..."

We have listed the top 10 sentiments. More sentiments do exist. Please review the full article for more information.



*Our bias meter rating uses data science including sentiment analysis, machine learning and our proprietary algorithm for determining biases in news articles. The rating is an independent analysis and is not affiliated nor sponsored by the news source or any other organization

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Contributing sentiments towards policy:

95% : If we are in a new period of global affairs, and if we are no longer in a post-9/11 world, then that shift has been gradually occurring.
93% : At least for a time, bin Laden had ameliorated great-power competition.
93% : What we have seen instead is a mix of cooperation and confrontation, based on how each power assesses its interests.
91% : It is challenging the wisdom of over-relying on a single great global-market continuum to provide goods and services necessary both for prosperity and security.
87% : Over the past month, there has been a plethora of pieces arguing that the coronavirus crisis has changed everything and that this modern-day plague marks a bright dividing line between the uncertain present and the preceding "post-9/11" era.
87% : Nor is it automatic that the damage caused by the pandemic is viewed equally by all states.
81% : If, over the last several years, the fight against terrorism was losing its luster and the post-9/11 proviso that the United States was threatened more by problems emanating from weak states than strong ones was being replaced by a return to competition among the great powers, then will the coronavirus cause countries to disavow power politics and place a greater emphasis on health and human security?
80% : It is testing existing alliance relationships and causing fractures in the current setup of globalization.
79% : Coronavirus is not becoming the central organizing principle but rather one more factor that countries must deal with in charting their foreign policies.
77% : Just as Derek Chollett and James Goldgeier coined the "11/9 to 9/11" tag to describe the period between the Fall of the Berlin Wall (the end of the Cold War) and what George Will famously described as the end of America's "holiday from history," does the coronavirus mark a similar sharp break?
76% : China has made its opening bid to encourage Europe to distance itself from the United States, while the U.S. hopes that the aftermath of the pandemic will strengthen calls for decoupling between the West and China.
75% : So, I am skeptical that we are on the verge of a massive shift in international affairs.
74% : After all, Osama bin Laden's rash strike and his penchant for making enemies had produced a rare convergence where, in the remaining months of 2001, the United States, its NATO allies and its partners in East Asia, but also Iran, Russia, China, India, and Saudi Arabia were all on the same page regarding the threat posed by Al Qaeda.
73% : But we have not had that one single shock, as in 9/11, which leads to a pause.
71% : Have we entered into a "new era" in international affairs?
68% : In the future, for instance, when we resume flying, will screen at the airport be less concerned about three ounces of liquids and gels and more focused on whether we are wearing masks, with body scanners reconfigured to detect temperatures and health conditions rather than concealed weapons?
65% : Gates believes that the threat of this pandemic unites all countries in a common fight and that eradicating this scourge ought to become the central task of every country's foreign policy.
59% : In the weeks following the September 11 attacks, including at a special symposium held at the National Interest, the question was raised as to whether the fight against Al Qaeda and international terrorism would become the new central organizing principle of U.S. foreign policy.
55% : Will March 2020 -- specifically 3/11, the day in which the United States began to reconfigure its domestic social and economic structures to cope with the coronavirus pandemic -- become this generation's 9/11 moment?
54% : China and Russia will not hesitate to take advantage of any openings that are created by the friction that coronavirus has created in the U.S. relationship with its allies, while the United States will not be disappointed if the challenges of coping with the pandemic create serious strains for Xi Jinping or Vladimir Putin in terms of their domestic governance.
51% : Make no mistake, the coronavirus is having an impact.
48% : The coronavirus was a "gray swan" -- for years we have expected that a massive infectious disease event with global reach might occur, even if the specific cause and timing were unknown.
45% : The pandemic is not going to end competition within an anarchic global system -- it will just become another factor.
31% : The coronavirus has not led North Korea to cease its provocations across the DMZ or to stop missile testing; it has not induced the Islamic Republic of Iran to abandon its nuclear program; it has not paused Chinese efforts to create a "new normal" in the South China Sea nor caused Russia to disgorge Crimea.
13% : In talking about the pandemic, Bill Gates could repurpose statements made by President George W. Bush and simply substitute "coronavirus" for terrorism.

*Our bias meter rating uses data science including sentiment analysis, machine learning and our proprietary algorithm for determining biases in news articles. The rating is an independent analysis and is not affiliated nor sponsored by the news source or any other organization

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