Trump administration blocks states from using Medicaid to respond to coronavirus crisis

Source: Los Angeles Times - View Original Article
Published: Mar 16, 2020
Category:
Bias Rating:

70% Liberal


Top 5 sentiments contributing towards policies:

63% : Sebelius invited states to seek waivers from Medicaid rules to make it easier for medical providers to quickly treat patients without worrying about their eligibility for government assistance.
61% : These include small steps such as allowing hospitals to more easily enroll patients in Medicaid.
57% : California and other states also want to ensure that mobile clinics and other temporary facilities set up to handle a crush of patients can bill Medicaid, which also would require a waiver.
56% : Despite mounting pleas from California and other states, the Trump administration isn't allowing states to use Medicaid more freely to respond to the coronavirus crisis by expanding medical services.
56% : Another element may be ideological: The administration official who oversees Medicaid, Seema Verma, head of the government's Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, has been a champion of efforts by conservative states to trim the number of people enrolled in Medicaid.
54% : "Medicaid could be the nation's biggest public health responder, but it's such an object of ire in this administration," said Sara Rosenbaum, a Medicaid expert at George Washington University.
53% : Medicaid, the half-century-old government safety net program, and the related Children's Health Insurance Program provide health insurance to more than 70 million low-income Americans, many of whom gained coverage through the 2010 Affordable Care Act.
46% : In 2005, for example, two weeks after Hurricane Katrina struck New Orleans, the administration of President George W. Bush told states that it would grant waivers so they could rapidly enroll people into Medicaid who had been displaced by the storm.

*Our bias meter rating uses data science including sentiment analysis, machine learning and our proprietary algorithm for determining biases in news articles. The rating is an independent analysis and is not affiliated nor sponsored by the news source or any other organization

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Contributing sentiments towards policy:

63% : Sebelius invited states to seek waivers from Medicaid rules to make it easier for medical providers to quickly treat patients without worrying about their eligibility for government assistance.
61% : These include small steps such as allowing hospitals to more easily enroll patients in Medicaid.
57% : California and other states also want to ensure that mobile clinics and other temporary facilities set up to handle a crush of patients can bill Medicaid, which also would require a waiver.
56% : Despite mounting pleas from California and other states, the Trump administration isn't allowing states to use Medicaid more freely to respond to the coronavirus crisis by expanding medical services.
56% : Another element may be ideological: The administration official who oversees Medicaid, Seema Verma, head of the government's Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, has been a champion of efforts by conservative states to trim the number of people enrolled in Medicaid.
54% : "Medicaid could be the nation's biggest public health responder, but it's such an object of ire in this administration," said Sara Rosenbaum, a Medicaid expert at George Washington University.
53% : Medicaid, the half-century-old government safety net program, and the related Children's Health Insurance Program provide health insurance to more than 70 million low-income Americans, many of whom gained coverage through the 2010 Affordable Care Act.
46% : In 2005, for example, two weeks after Hurricane Katrina struck New Orleans, the administration of President George W. Bush told states that it would grant waivers so they could rapidly enroll people into Medicaid who had been displaced by the storm.

*Our bias meter rating uses data science including sentiment analysis, machine learning and our proprietary algorithm for determining biases in news articles. The rating is an independent analysis and is not affiliated nor sponsored by the news source or any other organization