How to help the poorest through the lockdowns

Source: Financial Times - View Original Article
Published: May 03, 2020
Category:
Bias Rating:

53% Conservative


Bias Score Calculation:


Policies:

Universal Basic Income

Sentiments

94% "But above all, governments owe their poorest citizens an unconditional lifeline right now.""
92% "The deep and sudden downturn will inevitably set back the emerging world's success in lifting people out of poverty, and intensify the deprivation many ..."
87% "This experience should now be harnessed to make expanded and unconditional programmes available more broadly, at least though the lockdowns and the gradual easing ..."
84% "Many African countries have leapfrogged the richer world in developing electronic payments systems.""
83% "Versions of UBI had already been under consideration, and New Delhi's crisis response has introduced cash transfers to particularly vulnerable groups.""
81% "In poorer countries, the problem is more acute and resources more scarce.""
79% "In India alone, 140m workers have lost their jobs, and 22m people joined the ranks of those without enough food.""
75% "Any help going to those too rich to need it can always be clawed back in next year's taxes.""

We have listed the top 10 sentiments. More sentiments do exist. Please review the full article for more information.



*Our bias meter rating uses data science including sentiment analysis, machine learning and our proprietary algorithm for determining biases in news articles. The rating is an independent analysis and is not affiliated nor sponsored by the news source or any other organization

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Contributing sentiments towards policy:

94% : But above all, governments owe their poorest citizens an unconditional lifeline right now.
92% : The deep and sudden downturn will inevitably set back the emerging world's success in lifting people out of poverty, and intensify the deprivation many rich countries have seen grow since the global financial crisis.
87% : The speed with which livelihoods have slipped from the hands of those already living precariously has been astounding.
87% : Many emerging countries, including Mexico and Brazil, already have a long and successful experience with near-unconditional cash transfers to the poor as the most efficient way to deliver poverty relief.
87% : This experience should now be harnessed to make expanded and unconditional programmes available more broadly, at least though the lockdowns and the gradual easing of restrictions.
84% : Many African countries have leapfrogged the richer world in developing electronic payments systems.
83% : Versions of UBI had already been under consideration, and New Delhi's crisis response has introduced cash transfers to particularly vulnerable groups.
81% : In poorer countries, the problem is more acute and resources more scarce.
79% : In India alone, 140m workers have lost their jobs, and 22m people joined the ranks of those without enough food.
75% : Any help going to those too rich to need it can always be clawed back in next year's taxes.
75% : But here, too, there is a lot governments can do to help.
75% : In time, savings can be made by cutting back on much less efficient poverty relief in the form of subsidised fuel and food.
73% : The worldwide lockdown of economic activity inflicts most pain on those who can afford it the least.
71% : Many governments, though, still do not know enough about their citizens, with many beyond the reach of even mobile phone records.
70% : For now, rich countries should assist the most cash-strapped governments wanting to help their poorest.
64% : That leaves affordability.
62% : Implementing them temporarily would give useful information to make that choice later.
54% : In rich countries with well-developed welfare states this largely means ensuring funds are available and systems can cope with the task of getting money to recipients promptly.
52% : India has registered virtually its entire population through its trailblazing Aadhaar biometric ID system, though there are gaps in the financial "plumbing" needed to get money to everyone.
52% : Universal cash transfers will take substantial resources, though keeping people at least out of extreme poverty often costs less than one might think.
50% : It is imperative to do everything possible to limit the consequences of lockdowns for the poorest.
49% : The International Labour Organization says 1.6bn informal workers across the world have suffered "massive damage", their incomes falling by 60 per cent globally and more than 80 per cent in Latin America -- where the UN forecasts 29m people falling into poverty -- and Africa.
47% : Even in rich countries, millions of people suddenly struggle to make ends meet, as testified to by application rates for out-of-work benefits in the US and the UK that are magnitudes larger than anything seen even at the height of the global financial crisis.
44% : Again, the imperatives of speed and reach point in the direction of a temporary universal basic income (UBI).
29% : The technical ability to deliver cash transfers is coming within reach even for poor countries.
15% : Whether poor countries should aim for universal basic income schemes beyond this crisis is an open question.
8% : Where safety nets were less generous to begin with, governments have been right to avoid means-testing and prioritise speed and reach, as with America's cheques to households.

*Our bias meter rating uses data science including sentiment analysis, machine learning and our proprietary algorithm for determining biases in news articles. The rating is an independent analysis and is not affiliated nor sponsored by the news source or any other organization

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