After the Virus: California Liberals Say Returning to Normal Won't Be Enough

Source: The New York Times - View Original Article
Published: May 04, 2020
Category:
Bias Rating:

63% Liberal


Bias Score Calculation:


Policies:

Illegal Immigration

Sentiments

98% "Invoking Franklin D. Roosevelt and the social welfare programs that he championed, Mr. Garcetti said, the shock to our economy and our lives recalls ..."
95% "It absolutely has energized and mobilized our city, county and state in a way that we have been crying out for a long time.""
93% "Mark Ridley-Thomas, a Los Angeles County supervisor and co-chair of a statewide homelessness task force, is pushing a plan to keep those who have ..."
92% "But the crisis, he said, both emphasizes the needs and highlights the big price tag.""
89% "For years, people in Los Angeles like Andy Bales, who runs the Union Rescue Mission and has worked in homeless services for decades, have ..."
88% "While many in the country talk about returning to normal, a common refrain is emerging among California's powerful political left wing and many liberal ..."
87% "Yet grand ambitions are also coming up against stark realities.""
86% "It's the spirit of our times, Mr. Newsom said last week.""

We have listed the top 10 sentiments. More sentiments do exist. Please review the full article for more information.



*Our bias meter rating uses data science including sentiment analysis, machine learning and our proprietary algorithm for determining biases in news articles. The rating is an independent analysis and is not affiliated nor sponsored by the news source or any other organization

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Contributing sentiments towards policy:

98% : Even as the pandemic continues its march across the country, with more than 60,000 dead, California is already giving a glimpse of one side of the debate that will emerge from the crisis similar to the aftermath of great disruptions like the Great Depression and world wars: How should America change?
98% : Invoking Franklin D. Roosevelt and the social welfare programs that he championed, Mr. Garcetti said, "the shock to our economy and our lives recalls the scale and the challenges faced by the generation who sacrificed through the Great Depression and World War II.
95% : "It absolutely has energized and mobilized our city, county and state in a way that we have been crying out for a long time."
93% : Mark Ridley-Thomas, a Los Angeles County supervisor and co-chair of a statewide homelessness task force, is pushing a plan to keep those who have been housed during the pandemic indoors once the crisis abates.
92% : But the crisis, he said, "both emphasizes the needs and highlights the big price tag."
89% : Among the most significant moves was a recent order from the state's judicial council to end cash bail for most criminal charges, allowing thousands of people awaiting trial to be released from jails.
89% : For years, people in Los Angeles like Andy Bales, who runs the Union Rescue Mission and has worked in homeless services for decades, have called for a disaster declaration to fight the city's escalating homeless crisis.
88% : While many in the country talk about returning to normal, a common refrain is emerging among California's powerful political left wing and many liberal leaders across America: Normal wasn't working.
87% : Yet grand ambitions are also coming up against stark realities.
86% : "It's the spirit of our times," Mr. Newsom said last week.
85% : "We must ask of our city and our nation, at this time, is normal really what we want to come back to?"
84% : Analysts also question whether a liberal vision will be durable at a time when the state government will almost certainly be forced to shrink its services in the face of budget shortfalls.
84% : Tony Thurmond, which is seeking to use the crisis as a springboard.
83% : "The reset button was pushed, and I don't see us coming back."
83% : The question of durability also extends to efforts to get students the equipment they need to study from home.
82% : Some Californians wonder whether the will to enact significant change will endure past the initial stage of the coronavirus crisis.
82% : California's politicians are proud of the speed and alacrity with which they have moved to address problems that for years eluded them.
81% : Many people have also questioned the viability of hotel rooms as a long-term solution to California's homeless crisis.
81% : In all the progressive initiatives currently underway in California, Jim Newton, a lecturer in public policy at the University of California Los Angeles, sees an abiding tension between accelerated momentum toward Democratic goals and a constrained ability to finance them.
80% : Los Angeles rolled out countywide testing.
79% : "Whether you are talking about homelessness or whether you are talking about the criminal justice system and incarceration, we are doing things today that should have been done a long time ago," said George Gascon, a former San Francisco district attorney who is now running for the same office in Los Angeles.
78% : Propelled by the urgency of the coronavirus crisis, and despite severe economic headwinds, liberal Californians see this moment as an opening to push through an agenda that addresses some of the state's most intractable and long-debated problems.
78% : "What often takes a year, now we need to do in months."
78% : "We are playing the long game."
77% : In Los Angeles, Mayor Eric M. Garcetti has proposed using the crisis as a catalyst to achieve free higher education and to mitigate inequality.
76% : Though California is deeply blue, with Democrats holding all the top offices and a supermajority in the legislature, the state has failed for decades to tackle some of the biggest issues surrounding inequality.
76% : They hope that once the pandemic passes, part of its legacy will be to show America that it incarcerates too many people.
73% : "There's never been a time in my lifetime where internet connectivity has been as crucial as it is now."
72% : Google and other technology companies donated 70,000 devices for students, both in poorer urban neighborhood and remote rural ones.
71% : For decades, cash bail has been held out by activists as an exemplar of unfairness in the criminal justice system, with wealth the primary factor that determines whether someone is in jail or free.
70% : LOS ANGELES -- Housing for the homeless.
70% : "We are aiming for the fences," he said.
69% : Criminal justice reform.
69% : See more updates Updated 31m ago More live coverage: Global Markets New York As California cautiously reopens, it is in a relatively strong position, with far fewer deaths or infections per capita than New York and other hard-hit East Coast states.
69% : On Skid Row in downtown Los Angeles, tent encampments and squalor still overpower the streets, even though thousands of people who were homeless have been moved indoors since the pandemic began spreading in the city.
68% : Latest Updates: Coronavirus Outbreak in the U.S.
67% : "It's unfortunate it took a pandemic, but I'm thankful everyone is responding the way they are," said Mr. Bales.
67% : Mr. McGuire is part of a task force led by the state's superintendent of education,
64% : And they will have another potent argument: as state and local budgets collapse, the high cost of incarceration with be tougher to justify.
63% : Already, parts of a progressive agenda formulated months ago when California's coffers were full -- financing medical care for undocumented immigrants and providing greater access to child care are two examples -- may now need to be scaled back.
63% : " "Before this crisis, on a normal day in the United States, we could see the federal minimum wage stand still for years while executive compensation knew no limit," Mr. Garcetti said in a recent address to the city.
62% : By one measure, California has the nation's highest poverty rate.
62% : The pandemic in California has accelerated efforts to reduce prison populations, after decades when the state led the nation in get-tough-on-crime policies.
60% : Lenore Anderson, a former prosecutor in San Francisco and president of Californians for Safety and Justice, noted in a recent column that spending on prisons in California grew 65 percent faster over the last 20 years than spending on hospitals did -- a gap exposed by the pandemic, as hospitals found themselves scrambling to cope.
59% : Advocates for ending mass incarceration have seized on the coronavirus crisis to push for more inmate releases.
57% : "Rural California has been screaming from the top of our lungs about the digital divide for years," said State Senator Mike McGuire, who represents a large swath of territory in California's far north.
56% : "Going back to a normal in which those problems just return doesn't feel acceptable, particularly to the left," Mr. Newton said.
55% : Addressing the digital divide for schoolchildren in rural areas.
54% : Members of the board of supervisors in San Francisco have clashed with Mayor London Breed over what they say has been a slow take-up of the thousands of hotel rooms that the city earmarked for the homeless during the crisis.
53% : The Justice Department supports a Virginia church that says state restrictions violated its freedom.
49% : "The pandemic has forced a lot of things that were being talked about to actually take place at a very rapid pace," Mr. Gascon said.
48% : Mr. Carrier had been suffering from kidney problems and other ailments and had been recently released from the hospital.
48% : "We see a moonshot opportunity," Mr. Thurmond said of the attention that the crisis has brought to the digital access issue.
45% : (California voters in November will weigh a measure to permanently end cash bail and replace it with a system of risk assessment tools.)
45% : Longstanding shelters like the Union Rescue Mission, which has faced an outbreak among its residents and staff -- two people have died -- have had to reduce their capacity to comply with social distancing guidelines.
45% : But a program backed by FEMA called Project Roomkey has picked up the slack, opening up thousands of motel rooms for older homeless residents.
44% : In San Francisco, where tent encampments have proliferated, Ian Carrier, 36, died in his wheelchair on a sidewalk Tuesday night, according to April Slone, his sister.
44% : The state has so far relied largely on donations.
41% : At the same time, there was more evidence this week of the state's failure to protect its homeless during the crisis.
38% : Nearly 10,000 inmates have been released from state prisons or jails over the last few weeks.
35% : The website was quickly swamped.
35% : "My brother died on the street, and might not be dead if he'd had a bed to lie in," Ms. Slone said.
34% : He has been at the vanguard of a national movement of prosecutors looking to reduce mass incarceration.
32% : Mr. Thurmond organized a meeting in mid-April with telecommunications providers, imploring them to extend their high-speed services to remote areas.
31% : Already, thousands of people have been let out of the state's jails and prisons, cash bail has been eliminated for most crimes, thousands of homeless people now have roofs over their heads, and children in rural and poor areas of the state are being sent tens of thousands of laptop computers for distance learning -- temporary measures to confront the pandemic that leaders are hoping will become durable solutions to longstanding problems of inequity.
31% : Trump acknowledged that the virus had proved more lethal than he had expected.
24% : And even amid the pandemic, there is conservative pushback in California, with Republicans arguing that holding down spending should be the priority; one group has sued Gov. Gavin Newsom over a new program to provide undocumented Californians with unemployment payments.
17% : "With the safe release of a few thousand more people, and maintaining these declines permanently, California could come out of this crisis with the ability to do the previously impossible: close a prison," Ms. Anderson wrote.
12% : He says the state is asking for the cooperation of big telecommunications companies to better serve poorer and rural areas, but more forceful measures are being considered, too.
11% : Mr. McGuire said he had consulted lawyers to investigate whether the state has the authority to force companies to allow access to their high-speed fiber lines if the lines run through state-owned land.
11% : "If they're not willing, we're not afraid to use legislation, public pressure or whatever else is needed," he said.

*Our bias meter rating uses data science including sentiment analysis, machine learning and our proprietary algorithm for determining biases in news articles. The rating is an independent analysis and is not affiliated nor sponsored by the news source or any other organization

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